pokemon go: the suburban v. urban

In the city, people tend to make fun of the suburbs, rolling their eyes when they say the word. I’ll admit, I sometimes do the same when there’s mention of moving to New Jersey or Long Island for more space. But although I may act like an urbanite, I grew up in the suburbs and I like the suburbs. I may say I’m “from Houston,” but I’ve never lived in Houston, only in the cities that were half an hour, some almost an hour away. In the suburbs, you knew your neighbors and could play in the street and life was good. These days, however, I’m all about the city. Now that I’m older and working, my life is about pursuing and exploring – opportunities, friends, culture, and everything in between.

So yes, I once loved the suburbs and still kinda like it, but the comfort and stability of the ‘burbs just can’t compare to the energy and variety of the big ol’ city. So here are what I think are the major advantages and disadvantages of the suburban and urban environments … explained through my playing of Pokemon Go in each:

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The Suburban Environment: See any pokestops? Nope. Any pokemon? Nope. If you’re out on the hunt, you’re sorry out of luck. You wanna know why? Because it’s the suburbs. There’s nothing there. So just chill. Look at all those single family houses! The wide open space to roam around in! No crowds of tourists flocking to swipe a finger on a screen to collect virtual objects. No trash on the street or scaffolding poles you need to weave to avoid.

In the suburbs there’s no need to have your phone constantly in hand, because there’s not going to be a constant stream of emails and texts that you need to respond to right that second, and there’s not going to be some awesome pokemon just around the corner. And since you’re driving everywhere anyway, forget about hatching any eggs. You got real eggs in the fridge, because you go to Costco and can buy real eggs for cheap. People in the suburbs have better things to do than play a game like Pokemon Go.

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The Urban Environment: There’s everything you could possibly want, and a lot of things you don’t. Density takes on new meaning with a sea of pokestops within a stone’s throw, lure modules (signs of nearby people), and all manner of creatures, with rats (rattatas) and pigeons (pidgeys) every which way.

You’re constantly in the shadow of a high-rise, having your senses overwhelmed by lights and random things that pop up, and comparing yourself to the high levels and impressive pokemons of those you see at the gym. And you’re constantly on the move and multi-tasking: commuting, getting exercise, listening to music, catching pokemon, and hatching eggs. People might think you’re weird when they see you’re playing Pokemon Go, but you don’t care because you make your own decisions in life, so you just play on.

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today’s google doodle: jane jacobs!

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Did you see today’s Google doodle!? It’s of Jane Jacobs! In full disclosure, as much as I would like to truly, fully geek out over this, I’ve only read bits and pieces of The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961), which is primarily what she’s known for. Regardless, today is Jane Jacobs’s 100th birthday! Woot!

Basically anyone who’s ever even had a passing interest in urban studies or urban planning has heard of Jane Jacobs and her book. It really is that important. I’m not saying it’s great or that it’s the way to go, but it is something that should be read, or at least known about. Kudos to Google for acknowledging her influence and impact! However, in my estimation, it doesn’t quite rival the Google doodle of Viollet-le-Duc … because Eugène Viollet-le-Duc is hands down awesome in my mind, and his doodle was just classier.

a pretty flower, a pretty city

I wouldn’t call Shanghai a pretty city. Despite all the shiny buildings, there’s an overall lack of finesse, a roughness that comes with looking so far into the future that there’s no attention to detail. But sometimes you’ll walk around the city, and despite the whirring madness going on around you – the honking horns, weaving taxis, daredevil e-bikes, pushy pedestrians, and wailing children – you’ll find a sense of peace. It’s the kind of peace that doesn’t come often in one of the world’s largest cities, and seems almost awkward in the context.

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Shanghai, for all its downfalls, has its moments of triumph.